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Celebrating Black History Month with: Judith Turkson-Baidoo

"I sometimes feel that disability is treated as a secondary matter in society, and something needs to be done about this."

Judith Turkson-Baidoo, autistic woman and artist.

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Artwork by Judith

I started to understand more about my own autism diagnosis when I was 14. I was reading a school report at the time, and I just thought to myself, ‘what is autism?’. I started to do more research, although I mostly kept it to myself. I spoke to my mum about my diagnosis, to try and find out more.

I always found learning very difficult. However, I did excel in creative subjects, like art, music, and design and technology. I passed my A Levels and ended up doing a foundation diploma in Art and Design. I then went to university and got a degree in Fine Art, so it did work out in the end.

From personal experience, being both black and autistic means that people don’t always seem to understand me. I sometimes feel that disability is treated as a secondary matter in our society, and something needs to be done about this.

"I sometimes feel that disability is treated as a secondary matter in our society, and something needs to be done about this."
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Artwork by Judith