Why the Autism Friendly Award?

Public spaces can be overwhelming for an autistic person trying to deal with too much information. These spaces can be crowded, unpredictable, loud and bright. This is often made worse by a public that simply doesn’t understand autism. In fact, twenty eight per cent of autistic people have been asked to leave a public space because of behaviour associated with their autism. Whether you’ve had a good experience or a bad encounter take action to make sure the bad experiences don't happen again. Get started with our resources.

Many autistic people and their families give up using the shops and services that most people use every day. They close themselves off, and their worlds shrink. That's why seventy nine per cent of autistic people feel socially isolated.

How can you change it?

Together, we can work with shops and services that most people use every day to help them understand. That’s why we’ve established the Autism Friendly Award – to help businesses make those small changes which make a big difference to people on the autism spectrum.

Take action

The British Retail Consortium represents over 80% of the UK’s high street. We’re asking them to work with their membership, which includes some of the country’s biggest retailers, to make the high street autism-friendly. Find out more about making your high street autism-friendly, or sign the petition now.

Sign the petition

You can also take action to make more places autism-friendly

Know somewhere important to you that would benefit from an Autism Friendly Award?

Tell us which public space you want to make autism-friendly, whether that’s somewhere you’ve had a great experience or somewhere which really needs to improve. Together we can work with these public spaces to open up communities until everyone understands.

This public place – whether it’s a business like a high street shop, or service such as a café or library – might be really autism-friendly already, and deserve some recognition. Alternatively, it might be somewhere you’ve had a poor experience and think that some education and small changes could make a big difference.

Resources

Contact: autism.friendly@nas.org.uk to find out more.