We have set up this page to keep you updated following the vote to leave the European Union. We will add information as the situation becomes clearer.

27 January 2017

In order for the UK to leave the EU, the UK Government has to formally let the European Council know that it wants to withdraw. Doing this is often called “triggering Article 50”. The UK Government and the EU will then have talks on how this will work and a new agreement has to be reached within two years after the talks start.

The Government thought that it could start the process of leaving the EU without having it approved by Parliament (MPs) first. But a Supreme Court decision on 24 January 2017 said that the Government can’t do that. Instead, the Government has to get Parliament’s approval before it can trigger Article 50. 

After the Supreme Court decision, the Government introduced a Bill called the European Union (Notification of Withdrawal) Bill. This is the Bill that Members in both Houses will vote on to decide whether or not to give the Government the approval to start the process of leaving the EU.

No laws or rules have changed yet so this means there are still no changes to any of your existing rights, such as your right to support under laws like the Care Act or Welfare Reform Act

Also, please remember that most of the rules on care and support for autistic people are not made by the EU. Therefore, many of them will not change after we do leave. But we still do not know yet what rules or laws will change.

15 July 2016

There is now a new Prime Minister, Theresa May and she has announced her new Cabinet. There is a new Government Department called the Department for Exiting the European Union. This Department, headed by David Davis MP, will be responsible for the talks about how we leave the EU. The official talks with the EU about this have not started yet, but David Davis has suggested that they might start early next year. We will update this story with more information when it is available.

You can see a full list of the new Cabinet on the Government website.

30 June 2016

About the vote

On 23 June 2016, people in the UK voted to decide whether the country should stay in the European Union (EU). The result was that:

  • 52% of people voted to leave the EU
  • 48% of people voted to remain in the EU.

This means that more people voted to leave the EU. However, this change will not happen straight away. Under EU rules, you need to have talks to reach an agreement on how it will work before you leave. This can take up to two years after talks start.

Since the vote, there has been a lot of political change. The Prime Minister David Cameron announced he will step down in September. The Conservative party will now choose a new Prime Minister. No talks about how we leave the EU will start until the new Prime Minister has taken over.

What does this mean for me?

The UK will not leave the EU straight away. No laws or rules have changed yet because of the referendum. Importantly, this means there are no changes to any of your existing rights, such as your right to support under laws like the Care Act or Welfare Reform Act.

Please remember that most of the rules on care and support for autistic people are not made by the EU. Therefore, many of them will not change after we do leave. We do not know yet what rules or laws a government in the future will change.

Our charity will still be here to make sure politicians of all parties understand the needs of autistic people and will continue to campaign so that more autistic people are understood, supported and appreciated.

We will keep this page updated when more information is known. So, if you have questions about what leaving the EU will mean for autistic people, check back here.