For younger brothers and sisters

Bleach, F. (2001). Everybody is different: a book for young people who have brothers or sisters with autism. London. The National Autistic Society
This book is different! Written and illustrated by an accomplished artist who has worked in a National Autistic Society school, it explores the characteristics of autism, and what it feels like to be a brother or sister of someone with autism. 

Davis, J. (1994). Able autistic children with Asperger syndrome: a booklet for brothers and sisters. The Early Years Diagnostic Centre
Designed for siblings of children with able autism or Asperger syndrome from the age of seven, this booklet focuses on Asperger syndrome and the sibling experience.

Fairfoot, E. and Mayne, J. (2004). My special brother Rory. London: The National Autistic Society
A sister's view of the pleasures and pitfalls of having a brother with autism. A cheerful and positive book.

Gorrod, L. (1997). My brother is different. London: The National Autistic Society
Written by a mother of a child with autism and beautifully illustrated in full colour, this book explains the behaviour of a child with autism in terms that young siblings will understand. This book is aimed at younger siblings aged 4-7.

Hunter T. H. (2006). My sister is different. London: The National Autistic Society
The ups and downs of life with a sister who has autism, written and illustrated by ten-year-old whose sister has autism.

Koutsis, A., De Clercq, G., and Galbraith, R. (2006). What about me? The autism survival guide for kids. Australia: The Wantirna Heights School
It can be really tough living with a brother or sister who has autism. Join Spike the dog as he looks at autism and check out his survival tips to help make life a little easier.

Welton, J. (2003). Can I tell you about Asperger syndrome? A guide for family and friends. London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers
Adam is a nine-year-old boy with Asperger syndrome. Here he explains his talents and the difficulties as if talking to school friends and family. Jane Telford's cheerful pictures bring Adam's words to life.

Worksheet for primary schools. A worksheet that explains what autism is using a fun character called Ziggy is available to download here.

Information for younger brothers and sisters explaining what autism is can also be found on our website at: www.autism.org.uk/youngersibs

For adolescent brothers and sisters

Hoopman, K. (2000). Blue bottle mystery. London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers
Aimed at 8-13 year olds, this warm, fun-filled fantasy story has a hero with Asperger syndrome. Tied up with the exciting mystery is the story of how Ben is diagnosed with Asperger syndrome and how he and his family deal with the problems and the joys that come with this. This book is a delight to read and also a valuable teaching tool that demystifies Asperger syndrome.

Haddon, M. (2003). The curious incident of the dog in the night-time. London: David Fickling Books
Winner of the 2003 Guardian Children's Fiction Award and Whitbread Book of the Year. A really good read for readers old and young. The hero, Christopher Boone, is a teenager with Asperger syndrome. Contains some strong language.

Jackson, L. (2002). Freaks, geeks and Asperger syndrome. London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers
Luke, who has Asperger syndrome, was 13 when he wrote this book. He talks about a host of tricky teenage topics, including bullying and dating.

For adult brothers and sisters

Read a report about the experiences of siblings of people on the autism spectrum.

Attwood.T. (1998). Asperger's syndrome: a guide for parents and professionals. London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers
The strength of Tony Attwood's book is that he has made the essential imaginative leap into Asperger world. He has real empathy with the children and adults he writes about and his sympathy, knowledge and common sense come through on every page.

Attwood.T. (1993). Why does Chris do that? London: The National Autistic Society
Tony Attwood offers a better understanding of the unique difficulties associated with autism and Asperger syndrome. This is a really practical book, brim full of useful advice.