Getting out and about and doing the activities that all families enjoy is important for children with autism. It is also important for their brothers and sisters.

The following attractions have been recommended to us, and many offer concessions to visitors with special needs. If there are any attractions you particularly like and would recommend to others, please email webeditor@nas.org.uk

England

Northern Ireland

Scotland

Wales

Further afield

Useful websites

For more general information on events and attractions, you may like to visit the official UK tourist office website, Visit Britain, or the national tourist boards for England, Wales, Scotland or Northern Ireland. The four national sites also contain contact details for local tourist information centres. 

London has its own official website with a section containing information for visitors with special needs.

Another website which allows you to search for events, entertainment and activities throughout the UK is Days Out UK.

Cinema exhibitors' cards cost £6.00 and last for one year. The card is for people with a disability, who can use it to obtain one free cinema ticket for the person accompanying them. Various criteria have to be met and terms and conditions apply.

Visitwoods.org.uk features over 10,000 woods open to the public, many owned by the Woodland Trust, Forestry Commission, National Trust, Wildlife Trusts and RSPB. The site allows you to search for your nearest woodland by postcode, and in addition you can narrow your search by a range of features such as car parks, cycle paths, toilets, wheelchair access, etc.

A family with a child with autism living in Perth, Scotland, have created a website which lists details of concessionary prices for popular places to visit in Scotland. It is mainly aimed at parents and carers of children with a disability but may also be useful for adults with a disability. The website currently lists attractions in the Perth and Dundee but aims to cover the whole of Scotland.

 


Quick link to this page: www.autism.org.uk/19392