This is a select list of useful books and resources on Asperger syndrome. It is divided into 11 sections:


General

Attwood, T. (2008). The complete guide to Asperger’s syndrome. London: Jessica Kingsley, 1843106698, 400pp.
The definitive handbook for anyone affected by Asperger syndrome.
Available from Amazon or other booksellers.
Link to our selection: www.autism.org.uk/amazonshop

Attwood, T. (2002). Why does Chris do that?: some suggestions regarding the cause and management of the unusual behaviour of children and adults with autism and Asperger syndrome. London: The National Autistic Society, 1899280103, 67pp.
Makes suggestions regarding the management of unusual behaviour of children and adults with autism and Asperger syndrome.
Available from NAS Publications: www.autism.org.uk/pubs

Boyd, B. (2009). Appreciating Asperger syndrome: looking at the upside – with 300 positive points. London: Jessica Kingsley, 9781843106258, 222pp.
Shows that for every characteristic of Asperger syndrome that can be looked at negatively, there are several positive aspects that can be drawn on and developed.
Available from Amazon or other booksellers.
Link to our selection: www.autism.org.uk/amazonshop

Brown, M. and Miller, A. (2003). Aspects of Asperger’s syndrome: success in the teens and twenties. Clifton: Lucky Duck, 1904315127, 100pp.
Suggests specific activities and strategies to help overcome some of the difficulties that are encountered in everyday life.
Available from Amazon or other booksellers.
Link to our selection: www.autism.org.uk/amazonshop

Clark, J. (2010). Asperger's in pink for raising (or being!) a girl with Asperger's: a mother and daughter guidebook. Arlington, Texas: Future Horizons, 9781935274100, 200pp.
Parental guide to raising a daughter with Asperger syndrome.
Available from Amazon or other booksellers.
Link to our selection: www.autism.org.uk/amazonshop

Ehlers, S. and Gillberg, C. (2006). Asperger syndrome – an overview. London: The National Autistic Society, 1899280596, 48pp.
It is aimed at parents of young people with a diagnosis of Asperger syndrome, as well as professionals who want a concise description.
Available from NAS Publications: www.autism.org.uk/pubs

Frith, U. ed. (1991). Autism and Asperger Syndrome. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 052138608X, 257pp.
Includes the first ever comprehensive English translation of Hans Asperger’s paper together with chapters by Lorna Wing, Christopher Gillberg and Digby Tantam.

Hawkes, H. (2009). Asperger’s syndrome: the essential guide. Peterborough: Need2Know, 9781861440655, 136pp.
Written by a parent with a partner with Asperger syndrome who also has a child with the same disorder, the author reveals what it is like to live with Asperger syndrome and offers insights into living with the disorder.
Available from Amazon or other booksellers.
Link to our selection: www.autism.org.uk/amazonshop

Leventhal-Belfer, L. and Coe, C. (2004). Asperger’s syndrome in young children: a developmental guide for parents and professionals. London: Jessica Kingsley, 1843107481, 304pp.
Shows how to develop tailored early intervention strategies and to assist parents, teachers and mental health professionals in making informed decisions to nurture the development of children with AS.
Available from NAS Publications: www.autism.org.uk/pubs

Myles, B.S. et al. (2000). Asperger syndrome and sensory issues. Shawnee Mission, Kansas: Autism Asperger Publishing, 0967251486, 129pp.
Outlines how sensory processing occurs in people with Asperger syndrome and the particular difficulties they are likely to face.  Suggests a variety of intervention techniques which might be helpful.
Available from Amazon or other booksellers.
Link to our selection: www.autism.org.uk/amazonshop

Ozonoff, S., Dawson, G. and McPartland, J. (2002). A parent's guide to Asperger syndrome and high-functioning autism: how to meet the challenges and to help your child thrive. New York: Guilford Press, 1572305312, 278pp.
Features everyday problem-solving ideas and examples, the book describes useful strategies to help parents help their child learn to interact with others, understand the rules of appropriate behaviour, and become an active participant in school and family life.
Available from Amazon or other booksellers.
Link to our selection: www.autism.org.uk/amazonshop

Stanton, M. (2000). Learning to live with high functioning autism: a parent’s guide for professionals. London: Jessica Kingsley, 1853029157, 128pp.
Discusses the difficulties of getting a diagnosis and the effects diagnosis has on parents and on siblings.  Charts a child's progress through pre-school, school years and adolescence and into adulthood. 
Available from Amazon or other booksellers.
Link to our selection: www.autism.org.uk/amazonshop


Communication and social skills

Bogashina, O. (2005). Communication issues in autism and Asperger syndrome: do we speak the same language? London: Jessica Kingsley, 1843102676, 224pp.
Explores the effects of different perceptual and cognitive styles on the communication and language development of children with autism or Asperger syndrome
Available from Amazon or other booksellers.
Link to our selection: www.autism.org.uk/amazonshop

Harpur, J. Lawlor, M. and Fitzgerald, M. (2006). Succeeding with interventions for Asperger syndrome adolescents: a guide to communication and socialisation in interaction therapy. London: Jessica Kingsley, 1843103222, 224pp.
Presents a range of strategies to address the communication and socialisation difficulties experienced by adolescents with Asperger syndrome.
Available from Amazon or other booksellers.
Link to our selection: www.autism.org.uk/amazonshop

Norall, C.L.B. and Brust, B.W. (2009). Quirky, yes. Hopeless, no: practical tips to help your child with Asperger's syndrome be more socially accepted. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 9780312558499, 384pp.
Gives strategies on  how to help children with Asperger syndrome learn eighty five different social skills. These include greeting people and making eye contact, co-operating and asking for help, letting go and moving on to new tasks, handling teasing and bullying, being more polite and paying compliments.
Available from Amazon or other booksellers.
Link to our selection: www.autism.org.uk/amazonshop

Tantam, D. (2009). Can the world afford autistic spectrum disorder?: nonverbal communication, Asperger syndrome and the interbrain. London: Jessica Kingsley, 9781843106944, 256pp.
Explores the theories on nonverbal communication and how it shapes social behaviour. The author provides evidence for it being impaired in people with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD). He shows how knowledge of this difference can be used to overcome some of the impairments in nonverbal communication in people with an ASD, but also how acknowledging these problems can result in more positive development elsewhere.
Available from Amazon or other booksellers.
Link to our selection: www.autism.org.uk/amazonshop


Mental health

Ghaziuddin, M. (2005). Mental health aspects of autism and Asperger syndrome.  London: Jessica Kingsley, 1843107279, 224pp.
Explains the emotional and psychological difficulties that are often encountered with autistic spectrum disorders in children and adults. Gives guidance on early detection of and treatment for each of the conditions, which include schizophrenia, anxiety, depression and tic disorders.
Available from Amazon or other booksellers.
Link to our selection: www.autism.org.uk/amazonshop

Tinsley, M. and Hendrickx, S. (2008). Asperger syndrome and alcohol: drinking to cope? London: Jessica Kingsley,  9781843106098, 143pp.
Exposes the problem of people with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) using alcohol as a coping mechanism to deal with everyday life.
Available from Amazon or other booksellers.
Link to our selection: www.autism.org.uk/amazonshop


Practical strategies for the family

Al-Ghani, K.I. (2008). The red beast: controlling anger in children with Asperger’s syndrome. London: Jessica Kingsley, 9781843109433, 44pp.
This vibrant fully illustrated children's storybook is written for children aged 5+, and is an accessible, fun way to talk about anger, with useful tips about how to 'tame the red beast' and guidance for parents on how anger affects children with Asperger Syndrome. 
Available from Amazon or other booksellers.
Link to our selection: www.autism.org.uk/amazonshop

Boyd, B. (2003). Parenting a child with Asperger syndrome: 200 tips and strategies. London: Jessica Kingsley, 1843101378, 202pp.
Discusses parents' reaction to their child's AS and gives advice on how better to understand  the condition. This book helps parents to respond positively to the challenge of AS and find the 'treasure' in their child's way of being.
Available from Amazon or other booksellers.
Link to our selection: www.autism.org.uk/amazonshop

Lawrence, C. (2010). Successful school change and transition for the child with Asperger syndrome: a guide for parents. London: Jessica Kingsley, 9781849050524, 156pp.
Presents a range of material including guidance on choosing the right school, supporting the child during the period prior to the move, and identifying and practising the different 'social rules' and expectations of the new school.
Available from Amazon or other booksellers.
Link to our selection: www.autism.org.uk/amazonshop
 
Myles, B.S. and Southwick, J. (2005). Asperger syndrome and difficult moments: practical solutions for tantrums, rage and meltdowns. Shawnee Mission, Kansas: Autism Asperger Publishing,  1931282706, 112pp.
Outlines the characteristics of Asperger syndrome which may have an impact on behaviour. It then looks at the rage cycle and functional assessment of related behaviours. This leads to suggested strategies to promote self-awareness and self-management. Finally there is a section aimed specifically at parents. 
Available from Amazon or other booksellers.
Link to our selection: www.autism.org.uk/amazonshop

Stillman, W. (2005). The everything parent’s guide to children with Asperger’s syndrome: help, hope and guidance. Avon, Massachusetts: Perigee Books, 159337135, 288pp.
Written by a parent of a child with autism, this book offers advice, reassurance and real life scenarios to help families get through each day managing their child with Asperger syndrome.


Relationships

Lawson, W. (2006). Friendships: the Aspie way. London: Jessica Kingsley, 184310427X, 175pp.
Frank and thoughtful analysis of what makes and breaks friendships, explores what it means to have friends or be a friend - even a friend to oneself; what happens when times are tough and friends are scarce; whether one can be a 'good friend' without effort; and what other kinds of friendships there are, whether imaginary, animal or inanimate.
Available from Amazon or other booksellers.
Link to our selection: www.autism.org.uk/amazonshop

Slater-Walker, G. and Slater-Walker, C. (2002). An Asperger marriage. London: Jessica Kingsley, 1843100177, 160pp.
Examines a successful marriage of a couple where one partner has a diagnosis of Asperger syndrome. It looks at both perspectives and provides knowledge that will be of value, not only to similar couples and individuals with Asperger syndrome who are considering a relationship, but also the organizations that support relationships.
Available from Amazon or other booksellers.
Link to our selection: www.autism.org.uk/amazonshop

Stanford, A. (2003). Asperger syndrome and long-term relationships. London: Jessica Kingsley, 1843107341, 144pp.
By exploring Asperger syndrome traits step-by-step, the author, who is married to a man with Asperger syndrome, shows how understanding the interactions, motivations and reasoning behind certain Asperger syndrome behaviours can lead to better communication, relief of tension and ultimately to a happier, more mutually fulfilling relationship.
Available from Amazon or other booksellers.
Link to our selection: www.autism.org.uk/amazonshop


Employment

Edmonds, L.G. and Beardon L. eds. (2008). Asperger syndrome and employment: adults speak out about Asperger syndrome. London: Jessica Kingsley, 9781843106487, 172pp.
The adults with Asperger syndrome in this book explore the issues surrounding employment, providing advice and insights for others with Asperger syndrome, as well as their employees and colleagues.
Available from Amazon or other booksellers.
Link to our selection: www.autism.org.uk/amazonshop

Fast, Y. et al. (2004). Employment for individuals with Asperger syndrome or non-verbal learning disability: stories and strategies. London: Jessica Kingsley, 184310766X, 336pp.
As well as advice for people looking for a job, there is information for employers, agencies, and careers counsellors, including an analysis of typical strengths, and how to use these positively in the workplace.
Available from Amazon or other booksellers.
Link to our selection: www.autism.org.uk/amazonshop

Fausset, M.  (2005). Employing people with Asperger syndrome: a practical guide. London: The National Autistic Society, 1899280723, 72pp.
Designed to give employers, human resources staff and managers the tools they need to support people with Asperger syndrome from recruitment through to establishment in their jobs.
Available from NAS Publications: www.autism.org.uk/pubs

Simone, R. (2010). Asperger's on the job: must-have advice for people with Asperger's or high functioning autism and their employers, educators, and advocates. Arlington, Texas: Future Horizons, 9781935274094, 200pp.
Looks into employment from the points of view of the employer looking for staff with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and the employee with ASD looking for work. It looks into all aspects of employment beyond just the job and its tasks.
Available from Amazon or other booksellers.
Link to our selection: www.autism.org.uk/amazonshop


Parental accounts

Barber, K. (2006). Living your best life with Asperger's syndrome: how a young boy and his mother deal with the challenges and joys of being eleven, brilliant and socially absent. London: Sage, 1412919606, 128pp.
Each chapter provides a summary followed by anecdotal stories that illustrate a point, describing how a young boy navigates his way through the social challenges that he faces every day.
Available from Amazon or other booksellers.
Link to our selection: www.autism.org.uk/amazonshop

Rubinyi, S. (2007). Natural genius: the gifts of Asperger’s syndrome. London: Jessica Kingsley, 1843107848, 120pp.
A mother’s story of raising her son with Asperger syndrome, and how she has come to view his condition as a blessing.
Available from Amazon or other booksellers.
Link to our selection: www.autism.org.uk/amazonshop

Van Der Post, A. et al. (2009). Children and teenagers with Aspergers: the journey of parenting from birth to teens. Brentwood: Chipmunkapublishing, 9781847479044, 356pp.
Six case studies written by parents of children with Asperger syndrome.  They  recount life from birth to teenage years,  confronting reality and  giving experiences of problems, family structures, desperation and despair. Embedded within each family's story are their own solutions and ways of coping with their situations.
Available from Amazon or other booksellers.
Link to our selection: www.autism.org.uk/amazonshop


Personal accounts

Bentley, K. (2007). Alone together: making an Asperger marriage work. London: Jessica Kingsley, 9781843105374, 128pp.
Personal account of the author's relationship and marriage to a man with Asperger syndrome.
Available from Amazon or other booksellers.
Link to our selection: www.autism.org.uk/amazonshop

Fleisher, M. (2003). Making sense of the unfeasible: my life journey with Asperger syndrome. London: Jessica Kingsley, 1843101653, 1660pp.
In this engaging story, the author relates how he learnt to get the most out of life, with the support of his family and services for people with autism, despite family tragedy and personal difficulties.
Available from Amazon or other booksellers.
Link to our selection: www.autism.org.uk/amazonshop

Gerland, G. (2003). A real person: life on the outside. London: Souvenir Press, 0285636626, 254pp.
A personal account of a woman's life from childhood, who was only diagnosed with Asperger syndrome in her twenties. She offers deeply moving insights into the condition.
Available from Amazon or other booksellers.
Link to our selection: www.autism.org.uk/amazonshop

Jackson, L. (2002). Freaks, geeks and Asperger syndrome. London: Jessica Kingsley, 1843100983, 224pp.
An enlightening, honest and witty book which addresses difficult topics such as bullying, friendships, when and where to tell others about Asperger syndrome, school problems, dating and relationships, and mortality. Written by a thirteen-year-old who has Asperger syndrome.
Available from Amazon or other booksellers.
Link to our selection: www.autism.org.uk/amazonshop

McCabe, P., McCabe, E. and McCabe, J. (2003). Living and loving with Asperger syndrome: family viewpoints. London: Jessica Kingsley, 1843107449, 144pp.
The McCabe family - father (who has Asperger syndrome), wife and son discuss how Patrick's Asperger syndrome affects each relationship in the family.
Available from Amazon or other booksellers.
Link to our selection: www.autism.org.uk/amazonshop

Mitchell, C. (2005). Glass half empty glass half full: how Asperger syndrome has changed my life. Bristol: Lucky Duck, 9781412911627, 98pp.
A description of the author’s his life before and after diagnosis with Asperger syndrome. We follow him through school - where his lack of social interaction and anger continually landed him in trouble, and where he was bullied for being different – into adulthood.. At university, studying journalism, he was diagnosed with Asperger syndrome. Suddenly his life made more sense, and his  self-confidence returned, resulting in world travel, a Masters qualification and finally, acceptance.
Available from Amazon or other booksellers.
Link to our selection: www.autism.org.uk/amazonshop

Sainsbury, C. (2000). The Martian in the playground. Bristol: Lucky Duck, 1873942087, 140pp.
Written by a young woman with Asperger syndrome who succeeded in graduating from Oxford University. Shows what it is like to have Asperger syndrome, in particular the problems in communication and ways in which these can be overcome. A book intended for anyone who works with young people who have Asperger syndrome.
Available from Amazon or other booksellers.
Link to our selection: www.autism.org.uk/amazonshop

Tammet, D. (2007). Born on a blue day: a memoir of Asperger’s and an extraordinary mind. London: Hodder & Stoughton, 0340899751, 304pp.
A memoir by an adult with Asperger syndrome, this book tells of the way in which the author thinks: he sees numbers as shapes, colours and textures and can perform extraordinary maths in his head. He can also learn to speak a language fluently from scratch in a week.
Available from Amazon or other booksellers.
Link to our selection: www.autism.org.uk/amazonshop

Willey, L.H. (1999). Pretending to be normal: living with Asperger’s syndrome. London: Jessica Kingsley, 1853027499, 144pp.
An autobiography of a woman who, after years of self-doubt and self-denial, learned to embrace her Asperger syndrome traits with thanksgiving and joy.  Includes helpful coping strategies and guidance, based on the author's own experience, for a range of situations.


DVDs

Attwood, T. (2003). Asperger’s syndrome: a DVD guide for parents and professionals. DVD, 3 hours. London: Jessica Kingsley, 9781885477965
A presentation of lectures given in the USA on diagnosis and support issues for people with Asperger syndrome. Also available on video.
Available from Jessica Kingsley, 116 Pentonville Road, London N1 9JB, UK. Telephone: +44 (0)20 7833 2307

Baron-Cohen, S. (2006). Asperger syndrome: a different mind. DVD, 29 mins. London: Jessica Kingsley, 1843104717
Six children and adults with Asperger syndrome talk about their lives at home, work and school. They talk about their particular interests and difficulties and also what has helped them. Excellent introduction for families and schools.
Available from Jessica Kingsley, 116 Pentonville Road, London N1 9JB, UK. Telephone: +44 (0)20 7833 2307

Biomotion. (2010). An animated introduction to Asperger syndrome. DVD, 30 mins. London: Jessica Kingsley, 9781849051347
This film explains through a series of lively animations what Asperger syndrome is, what it feels like and how it can be helped, in a way that is both informative and easy to understand. Created by children in conjunction with professional animators, this film concisely summarises the basics of Asperger syndrome, enabling viewers of all ages to gain a real insight into the condition
Available from Amazon or other booksellers.
Link to our selection: www.autism.org.uk/amazonshop

Dubin, N. (2007). Asperger syndrome and employment: a personal guide to succeeding at work. DVD, 43 mins. London: Jessica Kingsley, 184318496
This DVD shows how success in the workplace is possible with perseverance and with the right supports and strategies in place.
Available from Jessica Kingsley, 116 Pentonville Road, London N1 9JB, UK. Telephone: +44 (0)20 7833 2307

Dubin, N. (2006). Being bullied: strategies and solutions for people with Asperger syndrome. DVD, 30 mins. London: Jessica Kingsley, 1843108437
This DVD is rooted in experiences and includes footage of Nick's own childhood behaviours that made him an easy victim for bullies, as well as testimonies from three other individuals with Asperger syndrome who describe their experiences of being bullied. It offers strategies to empower parents, professionals, schools, and individuals to prevent bullying.
Available from Jessica Kingsley, 116 Pentonville Road, London N1 9JB, UK. Telephone: +44 (0)20 7833 2307

Liverpool Asperger Team. (2005). An Asperger life: living with Asperger syndrome. DVD, 50 mins. Liverpool: Mersey Care NHS Trust & Mocha.
An insiders’ view of Asperger syndrome as told by six service users.
Available from NAS Publications: www.autism.org.uk/pubs

Paddington Arts. (2007). The invisible disability: living with Asperger syndrome. DVD, 20 mins,  London: Paddington Arts.
Looks at issues surrounding growing up with Asperger syndrome through the eyes of those who live with the condition.
Available from Paddington Arts, 32 Woodfield Road, London, W9 2BE, UK; tel: +44 (0)20 7286 2722


Newsletters

Asperger United
Published four times a year - a newsletter written by and for people with Asperger syndrome. The newsletter is only suitable for adolescents and adults with autism and Asperger syndrome. Parents and professionals are, however, welcome to subscribe. For further details contact: Publications Department, The National Autistic Society, 393 City Road, London, EC1V 1NG; tel: + 44 (0)20 7903 3542 or subscribe online at www.autism.org.uk/aspergerunited

Research

The Information Centre's database, Autism Data, holds information on over 24,000 titles of papers, books and articles on research into autism. It is available to search free of charge at www.autism.org.uk/autismdata. Literature searches and customised reading lists can also be provided on request. The Centre can also supply information about a range of current research projects in the field.


Please note that inclusion on this list does not imply an NAS recommendation. Some of these titles are out-of-print but loan copies should be available through your local public/college library network.

Quick link to this page: www.autism.org.uk/15346